June 2012 Montana Earns Four Transit Awards · June 29: LaFarge Safety Fest, and Drivers Ed, Big Sky High, Missoula July 2: Drivers Ed, Havre High July 10: Drivers Ed, Butte High - [PDF Document] (2024)

June 2012 Montana Earns Four Transit Awards· June 29: LaFarge Safety Fest, and Drivers Ed, Big Sky High, Missoula July 2: Drivers Ed, Havre High July 10: Drivers Ed, Butte High - [PDF Document] (1)

June 2012

S AFETEA-LU, the last long-term transportation authorization bill, expired on September 30, 2009. Since then,

Montana and the other states have been managing transportation programs under short-term funding extensions;

the current extension will expire on June 30. Recently, the federal surface transportation authorization process moved

into conference committee discussions, which is a crucial step forward. Though this is good news, passage of a multi-

year funding bill in the near term is still questionable.

To reach this point, both the House and Senate passed their own versions of a new transportation bill and entered

conference committee in early May. Conference committee is the step in the bill passage process where senators and representatives

begin negotiations toward developing a common bill to be considered for passage. Reports of progress made in conference so far vary,

but considering the date and the House and Senate calendars, it’s unlikely that a full bill could be completed, approved, and submitted

to the President for signature by the end of June.

It’s likely that there will be another funding extension to keep the program moving, though the length of an extension is uncertain.

MDT’s staff will continue to support our delegations’ efforts to protect Montana’s position and share of the national program.

Transportation Reauthorization Status

M ontana received four of the eight awards presented at the

Federal Transit Association Region VIII Conference in

association with the South West Area Transit Association

(SWATA) Conference in February. The city of Billings won the

Pacesetting Project award for their downtown transfer project.

This was the first transit center in the nation to win the Platinum

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certifi-

cation. This facility was featured in the U.S. Secretary of

Transportation’s blog on Earth Day.

Streamline, Bozeman’s transportation service,

received an award for the best bus wrap. Bus wraps

are graphics on a bus for advertisem*nt purposes. This

award was voted on by all present at the regional

conference. The Missoula Urban Transportation

District received the third award for the “Squeaky Clean

Grantee”. The Federal Transit Administration (FTA)

reviews states and urban areas every three years for

compliance with federal laws and guidelines. For the

last two review cycles, Missoula has received no find-

ings.

Pictured on the right, the

Squeaky Clean Award goes

to...(left to right) Tom Stuber,

Adam Kraft, Steven Potuzak,

Kenn Winegar, and David

Jacobs of the MDT Transit

Section.

MDT received the fourth award for Montana and was the only

state department of transportation to receive an individual award.

Much like Missoula, MDT received the Squeaky Clean Grantee

Award for state DOTs. MDT averaged only two findings per FTA

review since 2000. FTA stated that the Transit staff is incredibly

well organized and proactive. FTA also mentioned that Montana

is a good example of a state devoting sufficient staff resources to

transit.

Montana Earns Four Transit Awards

Streamline in Bozeman received an award for the best bus wrap.

Pictured on the left is the new

Billings Transfer Facility. In

the forefront is the environ-

mentally friendly solar panel

that helps offset energy costs.

June 2012 Montana Earns Four Transit Awards· June 29: LaFarge Safety Fest, and Drivers Ed, Big Sky High, Missoula July 2: Drivers Ed, Havre High July 10: Drivers Ed, Butte High - [PDF Document] (2)

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MDT Historian Jon Axline Honored for Outstanding

Volunteer Service

2011 TranPlan 21 Statewide Public Involvement and

Stakeholder Survey Results Available

M DT administers public involvement telephone and stakehold-

er surveys every two years as part of the TranPlan 21

(MDT’s long-range transportation policy plan) public involvement

process. The surveys are conducted by the University of Montana

through a statistically valid, random telephone survey and identify

changes in public and key transportation stakeholder groups’ opin-

ions on emerging issues resulting from MDT policies and programs.

According to the most recent 2011 Biennial TranPlan 21

Public Involvement Survey, Montanans want more facilities,

equipment, or services for the following items:

City streets.

Major highways other than interstates.

Rest areas.

Pedestrian walkways.

Montanans viewed nearly all problems studied as small. Only

one problem was viewed as moderately severe, which was road

pavement condition.

Montanans indicated that the highest priority on possible

actions to improve the transportation system are:

Maintain road pavement condition.

Improve physical condition of highways other than interstates.

Keep the public informed about transportation issues.

Take appropriate measures with roadside vegetation.

Support preserving existing rail service.

Because the 2011 survey includes many of the same questions

as similar surveys since 1994, MDT is able to track historic trends

in public satisfaction. Following are some examples:

Overall system satisfaction has improved.

Satisfaction with the physical condition of all system compo-

nents is the highest it has been since inception of the surveys.

Perceived system problems continue to be rated as small or

medium problems.

Possible system improvements remain rated medium priorities.

MDT average performance and customer service grades

declined slightly from 2009, but are still higher than all

other years.

In addition to the public telephone survey, MDT’s transporta-

tion stakeholder survey continues to be compared to past public and

stakeholder surveys. Opinions of the stakeholder surveys closely

match the public opinions. The complete results of the 2011 public

telephone and stakeholder surveys are available online at:

http://www.mdt.mt.gov/publications/docs/

surveys/2011_tranplan21_public_involvement.pdf

http://www.mdt.mt.gov/publications/docs/

surveys/2011_tranplan21_stakeholder.pdf

The chart below shows the percent of change in public satisfac-

tion with Montana’s system components from 2001-2011.

For more information, contact Doug McBroom at 444-7289

or [emailprotected].

T he Montana

Bureau of Mines

& Geology in Butte and

Jon Axline, MDT histo-

rian in Helena, are the

2012 recipients of

a First Lady Math &

Science Award for

creating Montana’s

Geological Road Signs.

Montana’s Geologic

Road Signs are a

cornerstone of the

Governor and First

Lady’s Math &

Science Initiative, reflecting the Governor and First Lady’s

personal interest in Montana’s geologic history. MDT and its

historian, Jon Axline, participated in this process and developed a

series of roadside geological markers that have grown to over 50

signs installed along Montana’s highways. Each interpretive sign

shares Montana’s geologic and paleontological wonders with

families, students, and tourists as they travel across the state. The

Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology at Montana Tech contrib-

uted technical expertise by identifying geologic features and

providing content for the signs.

Bureau staff and Jon often

traveled many miles to remote areas

of the state, to join the First Lady in

sharing the fascination of geology

with Montana’s schoolchildren.

These geologists used rocks, maps,

and stories to make geology come

alive and serve as role models of

successful scientists in Montana.

Jon has been with MDT for

more than 22 years and specializes

in the history of transportation in

Montana.

Jon Axline and Ed Deal receive award.

Pictured left to right are Lt. Governor John

Bohlinger, Jon Axline-MDT, Ed Deal-MT Tech

and Montana First Lady Nancy Schweitzer. Geological sign, located on

Secondary Highway 282 on the

Flathead Reservation, tells the

story of the Glacial Lake

Missoula ripple marks.

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Toavs Named Missoula

District Administrator

E d Toavs was recently named

Missoula District Administra-

tor. In this position he will oversee

the Missoula District operations.

Ed was born and raised in

Columbia Falls where he worked at

his dad’s automotive shop and spent

time helping out on the family farm.

After graduating from Columbia

Falls High School, he attended the

University of Idaho, earning a

degree in civil engineering.

In May 1994, Ed began his

MDT career working in construc-

tion in the Kalispell area. In the fall

of 2002, he was promoted to the

Great Falls Operations Engineer

position and spent over six years working in the Great Falls District,

as well as filling a temporary assignment in the Glendive District.

Ed was promoted to the Missoula District Construction Engineer

at the beginning of 2009 and then accepted the position of Missoula

District Administrator in January of this year. He is a registered

engineer in the state of Montana and has had great support from his

wife of fifteen years, Tracy, and their four children.

Ed can be contacted by e-mail at [emailprotected] or by phone at

523-5800.

Ed Toavs, MDT Missoula District

Administrator

W elcome Jacquelyn

Smith, the new

Community Transportation

Enhancement Program

Project Manager. Jacquelyn

began her duties in CTEP in

late February 2012, taking

over for Phil Inman who

moved to MDT’s Right-of-

Way Utilities Section.

She graduated from

Montana State University –

Bozeman in 2004 with a

degree in civil engineering.

During college, she worked

for the Department of Natural

Resources and Conservation

and Maxim Technologies, Incorporated.

Jacquelyn started with MDT the fall of 2004 in Helena

Road Design, Butte District crew. After a year in Helena, she

transferred to the Missoula District Office working in road

design and construction. She was in Missoula for six years

prior to accepting the CTEP Project Manager position in Helena.

She brings a wide background in project design, as well as

hands-on project management experience to CTEP. She also

brings a cheerful smile and great enthusiasm for her job.

Jacquelyn can be reached at 444-6118 or [emailprotected].

Jacquelyn Smith, new MDT CTEP

Project Manager

Smith Named CTEP

Project Manager

REGISTER NOW!

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Respect the Cage Schedule Respect the Cage is a traveling safety display simulating a roll-

over crash with a crash dummy demonstrating what happens to

an unbelted occupant during a rollover.

June 9: Benefis Health Care Fair, Great Falls Fairgrounds

June 14: Drivers Ed, Capital High, Helena

June 15: Drivers Ed, Sentential High, Missoula

June 15: Drivers Ed, Drummond and Philipsburg students at

Drummond High

June 16: Territorial Days, Deer Lodge

June 20: Drivers Ed, Livingston & Bozeman High

June 21: Anaconda Job Corp

June 22: Drivers Ed, Capital High

June 23: Celebration Days, Colstrip

June 25: Drivers Ed, Butte High

June 29: LaFarge Safety Fest, and Drivers Ed, Big Sky

High, Missoula

July 2: Drivers Ed, Havre High

July 10: Drivers Ed, Butte High

July 20-21: Hill County Fair

July 25: Drivers Ed, Belgrade and Bozeman High

August 3-4: Richland County Fair, Sidney

S taying alert and observing posted signage are vital for safe

travel through highway work zones. The majority of

crashes in work zones happen on straight roads, during day-

light hours and in clear weather conditions. For these reasons,

MDT urges everyone to pay extra attention when driving

through a work zone. Even when a work zone looks inactive,

it is vital that motorists follow posted signs. Work may not be

underway, but conditions may present hazards that are not

readily apparent and require slower speeds and extra caution.

This summer, remember to plan ahead and add extra time

to your travel itinerary. Dialing 511 or visiting

http://mdt511.com before you depart may save the stress of

encountering unexpected detours and delays, and may help

determine an alternate route to avoid construction.

Find out projects coming to your area by checking

http://www.mdt.mt.gov/travinfo/docs/tcp_montana_map.pdf.

MDT suggests following these safety tips when driving

through work zones:

Remain calm and patient — work zones are designed for

safety, and the purpose of the project is to improve the

road for future travel.

Pay attention to signs and obey road crew flaggers.

Be alert, expect the unexpected, and avoid distractions.

Follow posted speeds, even when crews are not present.

Give large trucks extra room.

Don’t tailgate.

Keep headlights on, even when you are stopped.

Remember, fines double in work zones in Montana.

Work Zone Safety

Reminders

2012 National Child Passenger

Safety Training

June 6-9—Billings

July 17-20—Great Falls

July 30-August 2—Helena (closed class)

September 25-26—Technician & instructor update

Become a certified child passenger safety technician. Use your

new skills to teach parents and caregivers about proper car seat

safety for their children. More information can be found at

http://www.mdt.mt.gov/in_the_spotlight. For information

about seat belt use and child passenger safety, go to

http://buckleup.mt.gov.

S pring in Montana means the beginning of motorcycle season.

Motorcycle crashes represent a relatively small proportion of

Montana's total crashes, but often result in serious injuries or

fatalities. As weather improves, expect to see more motorcyclists

on the roads.

Safety tips for motorcyclists:

Have the proper motorcycle endorsem*nt.

Regardless of experience, take a motorcycle education course.

Wear the proper protective gear, even on rides around town.

Use your signals and signs.

Make sure the headlight is working.

Never assume a vehicle sees you.

Proceed cautiously at intersections.

Be aware of weather conditions.

Give operating your motorcycle your full attention, and ride

sober.

Safety tips for motor vehicle drivers:

Be aware that it is motorcycle season.

Look twice for motorcycles before turning or changing lanes.

Remember a motorcycle’s smaller size can make it appear

farther away than it is and difficult to judge its speed.

Use your turn signals.

Leave plenty of room between your vehicle and a motorcycle

traveling in front of you, especially when roads are wet or

visibility is limited.

Be prepared for motorcyclists to adjust position within a lane.

Give driving your full attention and drive sober.

For more information on motorcycle rider training courses,

visit the Montana Motorcycle Rider Safety site at

http://motorcycle.msun.edu/brc.htm.

Safety Tips for Motorcycle

and Motor Vehicle Drivers

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In the past five years, roughly 67% of vehicle occupant fatalities did not use or improperly used a safety belt.

W ith travelers taking to the roads during the

Memorial Day weekend, MDT reminded

motorists to be extra cautious while traveling. During

the National May Mobilization Seat Belt Campaign

(May 21 – June 3), Montana law enforcement agen-

cies stepped up their efforts to encourage motorists to

Click It, Don’t Risk It by buckling up and making sure

children were properly restrained in child safety seats.

The traffic safety partners involved in the campaign

are dedicated to educating the public that buckling

seat belts saves lives. Seat belt use is the most effective way to

Memorial Day “Click It, Don’t Risk It” Campaign

reduce the risk of dying in a motor vehicle crash and

prevent serious injuries.

As we hit the half-year mark, preliminary Montana

Highway Patrol reports indicate a continued increase in

fatalities due to lack of seat belt use. MDT and law

enforcement would like to prevent even more deaths on

Montana roads by combining high-visibility enforce-

ment with heightened public awareness campaigns such

as Click It, Don’t Risk It.

When you travel, make sure you have a buckled, alert,

and sober driver behind the wheel. No one is safe in a motor

vehicle unless everyone is buckled up – Click it, Don’t Risk It.

Montana 2012 Seat Belt Survey Results In February 2012, the Montana Seat Belt Workgroup conducted a survey of Montanans aged 15 years and older. The goal of the

survey was to learn about attitudes toward seat belt use. A total of 1,832 individuals responded—following are some of the findings:

The majority of respondents (93%) reported always or almost

always wearing a seat belt when riding or driving a vehicle. Of

the 7% who indicated seldom, rarely, or never wearing a seat

belt, their primary reasons were lack of habit and just driving in

town. Younger individuals reported always wearing a seat belt

less frequently than individuals aged 20 years and older.

Consider this: Young drivers have less driving experience and

are more likely to be involved in a crash than older, more

experienced drivers. Seat belt use is an effective way to ensure

young drivers live to become experienced drivers.

When asked whether buckling up is the law in Montana, those

who don’t regularly buckle up were more likely to believe that

seat belts are not required by law.

Consider this: Montana has a seat belt law; it is a secondary

enforcement provision, which means an officer cannot stop a

vehicle with an unbelted occupant unless some other violation is

observed. When stopped for some other violation, a driver can

be ticketed for unbuckled occupants. Unbuckled individuals are

not only putting themselves and others at risk for an injury (or

worse), they are also breaking the law by not buckling up.

Individuals who reported they always or almost always wear a

seat belt, more frequently agreed with the statement Seat Belts

Are Necessary for Short Distance Travels than those who rarely

or never wear a seat belt.

Consider this: Even at low speed, crash forces (your weight

times the speed at which you are traveling) can cause significant

injury. At just 35 mph, you'll be thrown with the same force as

hitting the ground after falling from a four-story building.

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MDT Research Project Highlights

R ecently, the Research Review Committee (RRC) approved

and contracted five new research projects. They include the

following:

Oil Boom Effect on Montana’s Transportation System- contract-

ed to North Dakota State University.

Eastern Montana is experiencing rapid oil and gas development,

similar to neighboring western North Dakota, which resulted in

large-scale infrastructure needs. Given the recent history of west-

ern North Dakota and escalating activity levels in Montana, MDT

must develop an understanding of the impacts of oil development

and production on the future demands and impacts on Montana’s

highway system and traffic patterns. The general objectives of

this project are to develop a comprehensive forecasting tool that

MDT can use to predict truck traffic in oil development regions

and identify additional oil and gas developments in Montana that

may have potential impact on Montana's transportation infrastruc-

ture. Find out more on this project at

www.mdt.mt.gov/research/projects/pave/oil.shtml.

Portable Median Barrier (PMB) and Condition Transition Plan-

contracted to Western Transportation Institute.

This project includes a synthesis of past research and information

on PMB, with a focus on corrosion of the connection system,

maintenance of connection systems, corrosion mechanisms,

experiences of other states with PMB, and potential approaches

for developing a transition plan for barrier (or similar infrastruc-

ture) replacement. Two primary tasks will help to meet these

objectives: a literature review and a survey of state practice. The

result of this work will be a synthesis document that will aid

MDT in characterizing and addressing PMB corrosion in current

and future PMB deployments and in developing a transition plan

to implement identified solutions. Find out more on this project

at www.mdt.mt.gov/research/projects/safety/median.shtml.

Re-evaluation of Montana’s Air Quality Program- contracted to

TranSystems Corporation.

The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop practical

refinements to MDT’s current method for determining Montana’s

Air Quality Program projects, recommendations to improve and

implement the Montana Air Quality and Congestion Initiative

(MACI) program, and to keep the program oriented to high-value

investments for Montana communities. This research effort will

include a synthesis of relevant studies and determine current

practices appropriate for Montana through a review of past MDT

projects and processes, along with consultation and communica-

tion with other resource/regulatory agencies. The improved project assessment and funding priority outcomes may provide cost savings due to development of proactive projects that could prevent a non-attainment status, and fund trans-

portation projects that provide the highest air quality to cost benefit. Find out more on this project at

http://www.mdt.mt.gov/research/projects/planning/cmaq.shtml.

Evaluating Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions and Habitat Connectivity

in the Madison Valley- contracted to Western Transportation

Institute.

Wildlife-vehicle collisions (WVCs) along US Highway 287 and

MT 87 can create a public safety risk and a habitat connectivity

issue, which has generated some public concern in the Madison

Valley. However, the patterns and effects of WVCs and wildlife

movements across this highway corridor have not been studied in

depth. Proactively investigating the effect of this highway corri-

dor on wildlife conservation will provide timely information that

can be used by MDT in collaboration with resource management

agencies and local landowners to guide land use conservation

decisions as well as guide possible WVC mitigation efforts. A

major outcome of this project will be a GIS database of the study

area that has the potential to increase efficiency and effectiveness

for MDT and other agencies. Find out more on this project at

www.mdt.mt.gov/research/projects/env/madison_valley.shtml.

A Peer-to-Peer Traffic Safety Campaign Program- contracted to

Western Transportation Institute.

The purpose of this project is to create a peer-to-peer driver’s

safety program designed for high school students between the

ages of 15 and 18. This project will build upon an effective

outreach effort in Texas entitled Teens in the Driver Seat (TDS),

the nation’s first peer-to-peer driving safety program run by teens

for teens. This project will provide an opportunity to evaluate the

TDS program in a Montana-specific application and will serve as

a model for subsequent implementation of its best

practices in communities across the state. It will focus on

encouraging young people to be responsible for their own driving

and the safety of their passengers in the context of the five most

risky behaviors contributing to teen driver fatalities: driving at

night, speeding, distractions (cell phones, texting, other teens

in the car, etc.), lack of seat belt use, and alcohol use. This

increased awareness will be accomplished using a peer-to-peer

approach where high school students will create and disseminate

safety messages. The findings from this study will inform teens,

parents of teens, driving instructors, legislators, and the public

regarding the effectiveness of a peer-to-peer approach to traffic

safety for Montana’s teen driving population. Find out more on

this project at

www.mdt.mt.gov/research/projects/safety/peer_to_peer.shtml.

Research Corner

MDT research programs serve to discover, develop, and extend

knowledge needed to operate, maintain, and improve the

statewide multimodal transportation system.

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In the Beginning….Montana Roads and the Montana

State Highway Commission By Jon Axline, MDT Historian

2013 is the centennial year for the Montana Department of Transportation. Unquestionably, MDT has had a tremendous impact on the

state and its history. To celebrate the department’s colorful and important history, a series of articles about MDT’s first decade will

appear in the Newsline over the year, culminating December 2013 with FAQs about MDT’s history.

A t the dawn of the automobile age, public agitation for better

roads reached a climax in Montana. Good roads were a

common topic at Montana legislatures beginning in the 1890s.

State lawmakers and special interest groups unsuccessfully

supported efforts that would give

the federal and state govern-

ments greater roles in the

improvement of roads in the

state. But it wasn’t until late

1912 that it became common

knowledge among Montanans

that the Thirteenth Legislature

in 1913 was serious about enact-

ing significant road legislation.

On January 25, 1913, Flathead

County State Senator Fred

Whiteside introduced Senate

Bill No. 90, “An Act to establish

a Montana State Highway

Commission” into the state

legislature. The Senate

forwarded the bill to the Committee on Roads, Highways and

Bridges, where it was tabled on February 14. The Committee,

however, had already submitted a revised bill, Senate Bill No. 157,

creating a highway commission. That bill passed the Senate on a

28-0 vote on February 24; Governor Sam Stewart signed it into law

two weeks later on March 13. The bill marked the culmination of

many years of efforts by Good Roads enthusiasts, farmers, and

motorists in the state to create some form of centralized control

over road building in Montana. Unfortunately, the law lacked any

real authority. The newly-formed Montana State Highway Com-

mission functioned in a purely advisory capacity. The creation of

the highway commission coincided with the enactment of the first

Motor Vehicle Law, which required all vehicle owners to register

their vehicles with the Secretary of State. The state and counties

used funds obtained by vehicle licensing to raise “revenue for the

constructing, maintenance, and improvements of public highways.”

The new law specified that all highway commissioners be civil

engineers. When the Montana State Highway Commission held

its first meeting on April 4, 1913 in Helena, it consisted of

Robert D. Kneale, Archibald W. Mahon, and George R. Metlen.

Kneale was a professor of Engineering at the Montana State

Agricultural College in Bozeman, while Mahon was the State

Engineer. Metlen, a civil engineer from Beaverhead County,

served as the commission’s first secretary and contact person with

the counties. He was also the only member of the commission to

receive a salary – $3,500 per year. The legislature allocated $5,000

for the administration of the highway commission, but no money to

design or build roads.

Under the terms of the legislation that created the commission, it

could only “give [the counties] such advice, assistance, and super-

vision with regard to the road construction, improvement, and

maintenance throughout the state as time and conditions would

permit.” The law encouraged the counties to work with the new

highway commission, but did not make it mandatory they do so.

The commission made recommen-

dations for new roads, developed

standards for their construction, and

identified material sources. The

commissioners designated roads

built with state highway fund

money as state roads. The

commission developed rules and

regulations regarding materials for

road construction and published

pamphlets on the best practices for

the use of road machinery,

surfacing materials, and drainage.

Although the legislature intended

the commission as a centralized

authority to oversee the develop-

ment of the state’s road system, it,

in fact, had no authority over the counties. The primary responsi-

bility of the first highway commission was to dispense advice and

collect data.

Other provisions of the new highway law included the publica-

tion of biennial reports for the legislature and the development of

county maps and a statewide highway map. The legislature

specified that the counties would provide maps to the highway

commission so it could designate a state highway system. Many

counties, however, were slow in providing the information to the

commission, with three, Missoula, Ravalli, and Dawson, refusing

to cooperate with the highway commission. It was not until 1914

that the last county maps were made available to the commission

and then only because it hired draftsmen to complete them. The

maps identified roads of primary and secondary importance, and

indicated the state had approximately 67,747 miles of county

roads. By necessity, the counties, under the guidance of the

highway commission, directed their efforts at highways of primary

importance first.

At the first highway commission meeting, commissioners

Kneale and Mahon directed George Metlen to investigate the

possibility of utilizing convict labor on the construction of state

roads. State Penitentiary Warden Frank Conley had been

contracting convict labor to the counties to construct roads since

1910. The high quality of their work impressed Metlen, who

reported favorably on the use of such labor at the commission’s

next meeting. Beginning in 1913, the State Prison Board agreed to

allow the highway commission to oversee the use of convict labor

on state highway projects. Over the next 12 years, prison labor

built some 300 miles of roads through some of the most rugged

terrain in in western Montana.

Next issue: Prison Labor on Montana’s early highways.

This road is what would become US Highway 87 near Big Sandy. The

photo was taken in November 1922.

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6,150 copies of this public document were published at an estimated cost of $0.46 per copy for a total of $2,818 which includes $734

for printing and $2,084 for distribution.

Pre Sort Standard

U.S. Postage

PAID

Helena, MT

Permit No. 141

MDT’s mission is to serve the public by providing a transportation system and services

that emphasize quality, safety, cost effectiveness, economic vitality, and sensitivity to the environment.

Rail, Transit & Planning Division

Montana Department of Transportation

2701 Prospect Avenue

P.O. Box 201001 Helena, Montana 59620-1001

Inside This Issue

Newsline is a quarterly publication of the Rail, Transit and Planning Division, Montana Department of Transportation.

MDT attempts to provide accommodations for any known disability that may interfere with a person participating in any service, program, or

activity of the Department. Alternative accessible formats of this information will be provided upon request. For further information call

(406)444-3423, TTY (800)335-7592, or the Montana Relay at 711.

Contact Information Only the most frequently requested numbers are listed here. For an area or person not listed, call 800-714-7296 (in Montana only) or 406-444-3423. The TTY number is 406-444-7696 or 800-335-7592.

Administrator (Lynn Zanto) ............................................................... 444-3445

.................................................................................................... [emailprotected]

Bicyclist/Pedestrian (Mark Keeffe) ................................................. 444-9273

................................................................................................. [emailprotected]

Environmental (Tom Martin) ............................................................ 444-0879

................................................................................................ [emailprotected]

Highway Traffic Safety (Priscilla Sinclair) ......................................... 444-7417

................................................................................................ [emailprotected]

Map Orders ....................................................................................... 444-6119

.............................................................http://www.mdt.mt.gov/travinfo/maps

Multimodal Planning (Doug McBroom) ............................................ 444-7289

............................................................................................. [emailprotected]

Projects (Paul Johnson) ................................................................... 444-7259

........................................................................................... [emailprotected]

Secondary Roads (Wayne Noem)..................................................... 444-6109

.................................................................................................. [emailprotected]

Road Data & Mapping (Ed Ereth) ..................................................... 444-6111

.................................................................................................... [emailprotected]

Traffic Data (Becky Duke)................................................................. 444-6122

.................................................................................................... [emailprotected]

Transit (Audrey Allums) ................................................................... 444-4210

................................................................................................. [emailprotected]

Statewide & Urban Planning (Zia Kazimi) ........................................ 444-3445

................................................................................................. [emailprotected]

Newsline Editor (Sandra Waddell) ................................................... 444-7614

................................................................................................ [emailprotected]

To receive a list of highway projects MDT plans to present to the Transportation Commission, visit http://www.mdt.mt.gov/pubinvolve/docs/trans_comm/proposed_proj.pdf, or give us a call at 1-800-714-7296. Mail comments on proposed projects to MDT at the following address or e-mail them to [emailprotected].

MDT Project Analysis Manager PO Box 201001 Helena, MT 59620-1001

Inside this Issue Montana Earns Four Transit Awards ............................................. 1 Transportation Reauthorization Status ......................................... 1 MDT Historian Jon Axline Honored for Outstanding Volunteer Service ....................................................................................... 2 2011 TranPlan 21 Statewide Public Involvement and Stakeholder Survey Results Available ..................................... 2 Ed Toavs Named Missoula District Administrator ........................ 3 Jacquelyn Smith Named CTEP Project Manager .......................... 3 Tools of the Trade Conference ...................................................... 3 Work Zone Safety, Safety Tips for Motorcycle and Motor Vehicle & Child Passenger Safety Training ............................. 4 Respect the Cage Schedule .......................................................... 4 Memorial Day Click It, Don’t Risk It Seat belt Campaign ............. 5 Montana 2012 Seat Belt Survey Results ..................................... 5 MDT Research Project Highlights .................................................. 6 Montana Roads and the Montana State Highway Commission —In the Beginning (first of a series) ........................................ 7

MDT Wants Your Comments

June 2012 Montana Earns Four Transit Awards · June 29: LaFarge Safety Fest, and Drivers Ed, Big Sky High, Missoula July 2: Drivers Ed, Havre High July 10: Drivers Ed, Butte High - [PDF Document] (2024)

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